Scuba Diving and Snorkeling in U.S. Virgin Islands


Scuba Diving and Snorkeling in U.S. Virgin Islands

Scuba diving information in U.S. Virgin Islands

Dive or snorkel among the stunning coral reefs of the US Virgin Islands. Warm and calm seas, excellent visibility, from 18 to 30 meters, and a rich marine life are the main attractions for divers. More than 500 species of fish, 40 types of coral and hundreds of invertebrates inhabit the water. Vibrant blue tang, silvery horse-eye jacks, queen triggerfish, spiny Caribbean lobster, spotted eagle rays, creole wrasses, and cleaner gobies are just a sampling of the marine life populating the underwater terrain. As sun sets, octopus, seahorses and moray eels make their appearance. Hawksbill, green, and leatherback turtles, call the USVI home and can be seen on many a dive. Lucky vacationers may even witness turtles hatching on one of the many turtle nesting grounds. In St Croix diving attractions include a wall, more than 20 wrecks and kilometers of reef systems. The wall plunges to 4 kilometers in some areas, explaining the frequent sightings of dolphins and lemon and black-tip sharks. At sites like Cane Bay and West Wall big animals are frequent visitors, including migrating whales. On the west side, where the waters are calmer, sites like Sprat Hole, Swirling Reef and Alien Nation provide havens for nurse sharks, green and hawksbill turtles, and green morays. The island’s five wrecks are out west in Butler Bay, as is the famous Frederiksted Pier. St Thomas dominates the trio when it comes to wrecks. The WIT Shoal II and the WIT Power are among the most visited. Among St Thomas’ reef dives, one intriguing spot is Cow and Calf. Just a short ferry ride away lie St John and its reefs. At sites like Carvel Rock and Congo Cay keep your eyes peeled for tarpon, spadefish and turtles. The average water temperature is around 29°C in the summer and 26°C in the winter. The diving season is busiest from December through April. A recompression chamber is available on St. Thomas in case of dive emergencies. Whether you are newly certified or an advanced diver, diving in the U.S. Virgin Islands is easy, accessible and offers an array of experiences for everyone.

Geography and climate

The U.S. Virgin Islands is an unincorporated organized territory of the United States of America between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, east of Puerto Rico and west of the British Virgin Islands. The territory consists of three main islands: Saint Thomas, Saint John and Saint Croix, as well as several dozen smaller islands. The total land area of the territory is 346 km². The USVI enjoy a tropical climate, tempered by trade winds, with relatively low humidity and little seasonal temperature variation. The balmy temperature averages 25°C in winter, December through March, and 28°C in summer, June through August. The wettest months are August through November. Natural hazards include earthquakes, tropical cyclones, droughts and floods. Hurricane season peaks in August and September. November, early December and May are particularly good times to visit the USVI.

Entry requirements

Americans do not need a passports to visit the US Virgin Islands, but all other nationalities do. You may also need a visa, depending on your home country.

Health and safety

Vaccinations against hepatitis A, tetanus, diphtheria, tuberculosis and hepatitis B are sometimes advised. Pesky mosquitoes bite throughout the islands, so buy plenty of insect repellent. Some parts of St. Thomas, especially Charlotte Amalie can be risky at night. St. John is a relatively safe island and usual caution is advised when leaving your car unattended, especially at secluded beaches.

Time zone

UTC-4

Communications

We recommend that you purchase an international calling card. Roaming agreements exist with most international mobile phone operators. Internet is available at cafés, hotels and libraries.

Power and Electricity

110v/60Hz The plugs are the USA type.

Scuba Diving locations in U.S. Virgin Islands

Which are the best scuba diving locations in U.S. Virgin Islands? Below, you will find a list of all locations of U.S. Virgin Islands, organized by regions, in which you can dive and snorkel.

U.S. Virgin Islands

Scuba diving locations and photos from each location in U.S. Virgin Islands

Which locations in U.S. Virgin Islands have underwater photos? Below, you will find the list of locations from U.S. Virgin Islands and for each location a list of underwater photos.

Marine Species and photos of each species in U.S. Virgin Islands

Which marine species can I observe in U.S. Virgin Islands? Below, you will find the list of marine species and the photos for each species.

Underwater Photographers and photos from each photographer with photos taken in U.S. Virgin Islands

Which photographers have taken underwater photos in U.S. Virgin Islands? Below, you will find the list of underwater photographers and their photos in U.S. Virgin Islands.

Scuba Diving centers in U.S. Virgin Islands

Which scuba diving centers can I dive with in U.S. Virgin Islands? Below, you can see the list of scuba diving centers in U.S. Virgin Islands. Click on “more info” to find out more about each scuba diving center.

There are no diving centers available

Liveaboards in U.S. Virgin Islands

Which liveaboard can I dive with in U.S. Virgin Islands? Below, you can see the list of liveaboard in U.S. Virgin Islands. Click on “more info” to find out more about each liveaboard.

There are no liveaboard available

Accommodation in U.S. Virgin Islands

Which accommodation can I rest after my dive in U.S. Virgin Islands? Below, you can see the list of accommodation in U.S. Virgin Islands. Click on “more info” to find out more about each accommodation.

There are no accommodation available